psychology_courses

Master of Counselling and Psychotherapy

Develop a comprehensive understanding of counselling and psychotherapy practice, and build the high-level skills you need to be an expert in your profession.

This advanced training features:

  • a combination of on-campus workshops and online lectures and classes
  • an in-depth work placement of 240 hours.

Graduates will be eligible to be listed on the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA) register as a practitioner and accredited supervisor.

Have a question about this course?

At a glance

Study mode

laptop
Blended

Provider

Australian College of Applied Psychology (RTO 0500)
Career Opportunities
Recognition

Nationally recognised - meets Australian Qualifications Framework standards.
Accredited by the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia & meets intern membership requirements.

Prerequisites
  • Undergraduate degree in a cognate field of study (counselling, psychotherapy, psychology, social work, pastoral care, social welfare, natural therapies, mental health, palliative care, nursing, medicine, occupational therapy)
  • Undertake an Assessment of Readiness for the Counselling and Psychotherapy profession by questionnaire
  • Two referee reports
  • Completion of a National Criminal History Record check within 30 days of accepting the offer
Location

NSW - Sydney

QLD - Brisbane

VIC - Melbourne

SA - Adelaide

Course length
Full-time: 2 years | Part-time: 4 years
Study mode

Blended


Online

Study from anywhere, when it suits you best and graduate with the identical qualification as an on-campus student.

Blended

Study part of the course online. Combine your online learning with classes or practical sessions on-campus at a college or university.

In-class

Attend classes on-campus at a university, TAFE or college and interact face-to-face with teachers and fellow students.

Assessment
Practical & written assessments, research project
Start date

3 start dates per year.

Provider
Australian College of Applied Psychology (RTO 0500)

The Australian College of Applied Psychology (ACAP) specialises in applied psychology and counselling courses.

The College has over 20 years' experience in the industry, and is a member of key associations including the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA).

Navitas Professional Institute Pty Ltd (RTO 0500) trading as Australian College of Applied Psychology

Price

The course price can vary depending on a few factors, including whether you are an Australian resident or your chosen payment option. To find out more, contact the course provider.

Prerequisites

  • Undergraduate degree in a cognate field of study (counselling, psychotherapy, psychology, social work, pastoral care, social welfare, natural therapies, mental health, palliative care, nursing, medicine, occupational therapy)
  • Undertake an Assessment of Readiness for the Counselling and Psychotherapy profession by questionnaire
  • Two referee reports
  • Completion of a National Criminal History Record check within 30 days of accepting the offer

What you'll learn

You'll learn how to apply advanced counselling skills and techniques in an ethical and professional manner, and gain a heightened understanding of self and others.

Work placement

This course includes a total of 240 hours of professional work placement. This industry experience gives you invaluable real-life skills, so you graduate ready to step into a job.

Course structure

16 units

Year One

  1. Developing the Self of the Therapist


    This unit prepares students to advance their understanding of self and professional development as counsellors and psychotherapists. It places significant emphasis on change theory work, and understanding the influence of Person-centred therapy, Cognitive Behavioural therapy, Brief Solution-focused therapies and Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic therapies. The unit develops knowledge and facilitates skilled practice in the area of understanding the self in therapy.

    Students will become conversant with the complexities of individuals' multi-factorial development and the impact of this on their own development as therapists. Areas of learning include:

    • The role of the therapist and the client in making changes and how change is observed in process in each theory of personality
    • Resistance and the role of the therapist, and the relevant power and control issues identified in each approach
    • Theoretical perspectives of the self in therapy
    • Skills practice in working at relational depth.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of the self on their counselling practice through journaling their life story
    • Identify and analyse the physical, emotional, intellectual and social contributors to individual development
    • Demonstrate in depth knowledge, understanding and analysis of the characteristics of effective therapists
    • Demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of change, change theory and resistance to change
    • Identify and evaluate power and control issues in the therapeutic relationship.
  2. Counselling in a Diverse World


    This unit prepares students to work in an informed way with diversity within client settings. It develops knowledge and skilled practice in the areas of social identity, stigma and discrimination, gender and sexuality, internalised homophobia and ageing. Students will become conversant with the complex interplay involved in the following:

    • The human need for belonging and consequent categorisation of self and others
    • The attitudes and behaviours that lead to stigma and discrimination
    • The values, beliefs and behaviours impacting the development of gender and sexuality
    • The development of attitudes and constructs regarding internalised and externalised heterosexism and homophobia
    • The vulnerabilities faced by ageing and disabled people, encompassing health, mobility, ageism, loss, isolation and mortality.

    The unit provides students with opportunities to explore the diversity of client presentations for counselling and psychotherapy, and supports the development of skills in self-awareness, sensitivity, multicultural counselling and informed practice.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate understanding of Social Identity theory, including the concept of "several selves", and how the need for social group membership impacts on socio-cultural identity and acceptance of difference
    • Recognise and distinguish the key concepts of stigma, prejudice, stereotypes and discrimination, and critically reflect upon the implications of diversity, inequality, social injustice and advocacy
    • Demonstrate understanding of the influences impacting on psychosexual development, including critical analysis of values, beliefs and biases regarding gender and sexuality
    • Understand and apply social policy on social inclusion to intervention planning with client populations that experience stigma, inequality and injustice
    • Understand and describe psychosexual development in association with the social influences that impact on development
    • Critically analyse their own values, beliefs and biases regarding gender and sexuality
    • Demonstrate an in depth understanding of the core constructs of internalised homophobia, including the contexts, associations, impacts and outcomes
    • Develop and demonstrate knowledge and sensitivity to the issues and social contexts when counselling elderly people, including the ability to understand and appreciate the impact of the history and generation on the perspectives and needs of the elderly, which include review of memories, relationships and life meaning.
  3. Mental Health Counselling


    This unit provides students with the knowledge and skills to identify mental health issues and conditions, and their social and biological determinants. In this unit key considerations will include: the meaning and incidence of mental health problems, current issues in mental health, and identified features and behaviours of those with common types of mental health problems. Students will develop skills in applying evidencedbased interventions for mental health conditions. The unit also focuses on working in interdisciplinary teams and in developing effective therapeutic relationships. Students will also explore government and policies and social concerns about mental health and will be encouraged to reflect on their own views.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate understanding of the range of mental health disorders which may impact on children, young people and adults, their prevalence and impact on social functioning;
    • Demonstrate knowledge of social and biological determinants of mental health and wellbeing across the lifespan and apply this knowledge to intervention planning;
    • Demonstrate knowledge and skills in evidence based interventions to improve the outcomes for people living with mental illness including Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, Interpersonal Therapy and family and group interventions;
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the role of advocacy groups and their influence on Government policy such as the National Mental Health Plan with its whole of government, cross sectorial approach, and the needs and rights of consumers and their families and carers;
    • Understand the impact of personality disorders on social functioning and develop effective counselling relationships with people who have personality disorders.
  4. Ethics in Practice


    This unit is considered a central and integral part of the course, providing an awareness and understanding of ethical and legal issues in counselling and psychotherapy. The philosophical bases and approaches to ethics and ethical decision-making will be explored. The unit offers a knowledge base for understanding the ethical foundations of the profession, and an awareness of critical issues such as boundaries, confidentiality, power, trust, and respect for diversity and difference. Students are expected to understand the effect of values, labelling and stereotyping for themselves as counsellors and/or managers.

    Learning Outcomes

    • Analyse the philosophical basis of ethics and of mature ethical decision-making practices with relevance to counselling
    • Evaluate counsellor and psychotherapist responsibilities with respect to legal and ethical issues including reference to professional codes of ethics, relevant policy and legislation
    • Critique and analyse ethical principles of confidentiality, boundary setting and trust in the therapeutic relationship
    • Demonstrate respect for client needs, rights and autonomy
    • Demonstrate awareness of the role of power in the therapeutic relationship.
  5. Increasing Therapeutic Effectiveness


    This unit will examine and critically analyse the research evidence on therapeutic effectiveness. By the completion of this unit, students are expected to apply micro-skills and advanced therapeutic strategies and interventions to enhance the counsellor-client alliance and improve therapeutic effectiveness. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills in counselling assessment, case conceptualisation, and client feedback tools. Advanced knowledge of evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence will be a key focus of the unit.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this unit, students will be able to demonstrate:

    • Critical analysis of the research evidence on therapeutic effectiveness
    • In depth knowledge of research evidence for counselling and psychotherapy practice with specific client groups
    • Application of micro skills and advanced therapeutic strategies to enhance the counsellor-client alliance and improve therapeutic effectiveness
    • They have developed case conceptualisation skills to identify indicators of premature drop out from therapy and treatment failure.
  6. Group Therapy


    This unit looks at the theory and application of group therapy. It provides an opportunity for students to develop their capacity to apply group work theory and practice in a variety of contexts and settings. Students will learn about the theoretical underpinnings that inform the dynamics of group processes and the stages of group development. Students will learn to apply their knowledge and skills to real and simulated situations. Emphasis throughout the unit is placed on developing a practical framework to manage, lead and participate in groups in a range of contexts and circumstances.

    Learning Outcomes

    • Describe the rationale for groupwork and an overview of historical perspectives on the development and application of groupwork
    • Develop a systematic approach to groupwork planning, program development and associated administrative functions
    • Identify and describe the key elements of group dynamics and group process
    • Implement appropriate adult learning principles, communication skills and group techniques for conducting and/or facilitating a group and group process
    • Demonstrate group observation and analysis skills and implement and explain a range of intervention strategies to deal with a variety of groupwork situations
    • Compare a range of counselling and personal growth groups, the roles and functions of the leader within these groups, and special issues related to these groups describe and discuss the ethical and legal dimensions of groupwork.
  7. Contemporary Psychotherapy


    This unit provides students with the opportunity to develop in depth knowledge about a range of contemporary psychotherapy models and their historical development, including Freudian, Object Relations, Lacanian, Self Psychology, Cognitive- Behavioural, Feminist and Constructivist therapies. Students will be introduced to the current controversies and debates about these models.

    Students will develop comparative understandings of these models' view of the self, the body, the unconscious, the nature of consciousness and the role of defences. The conceptualisation of the role of the therapist within each modality will also be compared. The strengths and limitations of each model will be critically reviewed.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development and key concepts of the psychotherapy models studied
    • Critically evaluate these models' therapeutic effectiveness and limitations with reference to contemporary research findings
    • Critically compare concepts of consciousness, the Unconscious, dreams, the body, defence mechanisms, anxiety and the role of therapist across models studied
    • Demonstrate and critically analyse therapeutic skills pertaining to different models and modes of interpretation
    • Demonstrate integration of the selected method/s with their own models of practice and therapeutic skills.

Year Two

  1. Trauma & Grief Therapy


    This unit explores the central issues around trauma and grief and the counselling process. Students are provided with opportunities to build on and develop counselling skills and techniques for the purpose of counselling people presenting with these issues and concerns. Upon completion of this unit, students will have skills in assessing trauma and grief, have knowledge of interventions appropriate to different trauma and grief contexts and presentations, and be keenly aware of ethical issues related to this field of counselling. Issues such as boundaries, vicarious trauma and personal care, and referral will be examined in the unit.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate understanding of the types and impacts of trauma and grief and the needs of different counselling populations
    • Demonstrate an awareness of the central issues in grief and trauma counselling and apply models of assessment to counselling practice
    • Demonstrate knowledge and skills of evidence-based interventions for specific losses and trauma populations; including bereavement, suicide bereavement, children and young people, and multiple losses and traumas experienced by Indigenous Australians
    • Critically evaluate ethical issues related to grief and trauma counselling; including counselling competence, boundaries, referral and supervision.
  2. Counselling & Psychotherapy Research


    This unit is an introduction to academic research and evaluation, with particular attention to research in counselling and psychotherapy. A range of philosophical approaches to research and their related methodologies will be introduced. Students will develop skills in research and evaluation design and methods. The benefits of both process and outcome research to professional practice will be highlighted. Students will examine and critically evaluate published research and evaluation reports in the counselling and psychotherapy field, with the aim of developing their own capacity as informed consumers of research. Topics for student research and evaluation projects will be identified and developed, and linked to appropriate methodologies. The ethics of research, in particular the NHMRC Ethical Guidelines, and ethical principles associated with informed consent, confidentiality, privacy, data collection, and reporting, will be critically examined.

    Learning outcomes

    By the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

    • Apply skills in research design, including developing research questions and critically evaluating other research in the development of their research proposals
    • Understand and apply skills in a range of qualitative and /or quantitative research methods 
    • Understand and apply the steps involved in designing a research or evaluation study in counselling and psychotherapy, including the development of data collection measures and timeline 
    • Critically analyse the ethical issues involved in research 
    • Apply NHMRC ethical guidelines and counselling and psychotherapy research ethics to the development of the National Ethics Application Form
  3. Advanced Placement & Supervision 1


    Placements are a formative component of counselling education. This placement unit in the Master of Counselling and Psychotherapy provides students with opportunities to develop advanced practice skills and responsibility for client welfare in a collaborative and supported learning environment. Students undertake an approved supervised counselling placement, participate in fortnightly two hour "face-to-face" (via blackboard collaboration) small group supervision of their counselling practice and journal their experiences using MAHARA (an online e-Portfolio). Students must be in a clinical counselling practice context or be registered in an approved placement prior to enrolling in this unit. This unit supports students' development of self awareness, interventions with clients with particular attention to reflective and ethical practice. 

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Apply advanced theoretical knowledge and counselling skills to practice with clients in a counselling agency
    • Analyse the influence of organisational, cultural and social contexts on counselling practice
    • Analyse and critique their use of counselling skills and interventions
    • Develop intervention planning and case formulation skills and apply counselling models to meet client needs
    • Participate effectively in group supervision and reflect on their practice
    • Synthesize and apply feedback to improve practice with clients
    • Give effective feedback respectfully and appropriately
    • Demonstrate ethical thinking and decision making about their practice and respect the rights of clients.
  4. Advanced Placement & Supervision 2


    This unit follows on from COUN6211 Advanced Counselling Placement and Supervision 1. The placement provides the opportunity for the application of advanced theoretical knowledge and skills in a supported learning environment. Students will develop their skills in case formulation and in applying strategic interventions. An important focus of the placement experience is the development of critical reflection of one's own practice, the client, and the organisational context. Students will continue their approved counselling placement, and participate in collaborative small group supervision (via Blackboard Collaboration)

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Apply advanced theoretical knowledge and counselling skills to practice with clients in a counselling agency
    • Analyse the influence of organisational, cultural and social contexts on counselling practice
    • Analyse and critique their use of counselling skills and interventions
    • Develop intervention planning and case formulation skills and apply counselling models to meet client needs
    • Participate effectively in group supervision and reflect on their practice
    • Synthesize and apply feedback to improve practice with clients
    • Give effective feedback respectfully and appropriately
    • Demonstrate ethical thinking and decision making about their practice and respect the rights of clients.
  5. Research Project 1


    This unit is designed to develop the student researcher's understanding of the research enterprise by exploring further research approaches, through conducting a literature review, and by collecting field data. Different paradigms and approaches to research will be reviewed with a particular focus on counselling and psychotherapy research. An emphasis will be placed on matching research designs to the aims and purposes of respective research projects and to promote ethical research practices. Students will examine how best to construct a literature review that is comprehensive and fit for purpose. Different approaches to data collection will be examined including surveys, semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, selfreport questionnaires, to name a few. In addition, approaches to data analysis will be explored with particular attention to the organisation of research data ready for more detailed analysis.

    Learning Outcomes

    By completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Undertake a systematic literature search on their research topic, using electronic data bases, to contextualise their research study
    • Critically analyse a body of literature relevant to their research topic to identify level of evidence of published research, findings, areas of consensus and disagreement and gaps in the literature
    • Demonstrate advanced writing skills in developing a literature review which demonstrates critical analysis of a body of published research
    • Undertake the data collection phase of a research study effectively
    • Apply ethical guidelines for researchers to research practice and critically reflect on ethical issues as they arise
    • Accurately record and organise research data systematically in preparation for data analysis.
  6. Research Project 2


    This unit follows on from COUN6241 Research Project 1 and provides students with opportunities to further develop their understanding of research and the application of research methodologies. Students will be expected to apply systematic data analysis techniques to data collected in Research Project 1. Emphasis will be placed on critically analysing data and reflecting upon its meaning and implications, developing written research reports and on the presentation of research findings. Student will be expected to review their research designs considering both their strengths and limitations and to reflect upon directions for new research.

    Learning Outcomes

    By completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Apply systematic data analysis techniques to data collected in Research Project 1
    • Apply accepted qualitative and /or quantitative techniques in data analysis
    • Critically reflect on the process of conducting the research study
    • Demonstrate advanced writing skills in developing their research report
    • Apply ethical guidelines for researchers to research practice and critically reflect on ethical issues as they arise
    • Report back to participants on research findings
    • Demonstrate professional skills in presenting and discussing data with peers.

Electives

  1. Advanced Alcohol & Other Drugs Counselling


    Learning Outcomes

    By completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Apply a range of treatment options appropriately according to the assessment of client needs
    • Critically analyse the evidence base for alcohol and other drugs counselling
    • Critically analyse the interactions between individual drug use and the social context
    • Analyse the impacts on families of substance use, abuse and dependency
    • Critically analyse the literature on AOD counselling with clients who have concurrent conditions
    • Develop and apply advanced knowledge and skills in assessing clients' levels and types of substance use, abuse and dependency
    • Match alcohol and other drug treatment options to individual client needs
    • Develop assessment and referral skills for working effectively with clients who present with substance use, abuse and dependency issues
    • Identify special needs groups and clients, including ATSI and CALD communities, and develop evidence based interventions to meet their needs
    • Develop strategies for relapse prevention during and post counselling
    • Discuss current practice issues for substance use, abuse and dependency counsellors.
  2. Constructivist Therapies


    Learning Outcomes

    By completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate in depth understanding of the influence of social constructivism and postmodernism on counselling and psychotherapy theories
    • Critically compare the philosophical basis of narrative therapy and solution focused therapy with dominant models of counselling and psychotherapy
    • Identify the influence of "second generation" constructivist therapy on theory and practice
    • Critically evaluate the research base for the effectiveness of narrative and solution focused therapies
    • Apply the skills of narrative therapy and solution focused therapy in practice
    • Identify the strengths and limitations of narrative therapy and solution focused therapy
    • Critically discuss ethical issues of applying narrative therapy and solution focused therapy to practice.
  3. Counselling Children & Young People


    Learning Outcomes

    By completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate comprehension of an integrated systemic perspective to assessment and intervention with children, young people and their families
    • Develop and apply in depth knowledge of a range of experiential counselling and psychotherapy models for counselling children and young people
    • Analyse and evaluate their own responses to working with children and young people; including potential triggers, countertransference, and maintaining ethical boundaries
    • Critically analyse and compare the effectiveness and evidence base of a range of approaches to therapy with children and young people
    • Demonstrate and apply knowledge of ethical issues related to counselling children and young people, including confidentiality and reporting of risk to safety.
  4. Counselling Theory & Practice


    Counselling Theory and Practice is designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in the historical, philosophical, and theoretical bases of major schools of counselling and psychotherapy, including psychodynamic, humanistic-existential, cognitive-behavioural, and postmodern approaches. Students will not only be exposed to the theory underlying these counselling schools, but also have opportunity to learn and practice specific processes and skills associated with each framework. In addition this unit will focus on evaluating the strengths, limitations, and evidence-base of the major approaches to counselling, as well as their potential application with diverse groups of clients. Finally, students will critically reflect on and begin to identify specific counselling methodologies that resonate with their own developing framework of practice.

    Learning outcomes

    By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

    • Describe the historical development, philosophical influences and theoretical bases of major psychotherapeutic schools
    • Understand and apply important skills and processes from a range of counselling approaches
    • Critically evaluate the strengths, limitations and evidentiary base of major schools of counselling
    • Evaluate the potential application of a variety of counselling frameworks with diverse groups of clients
    • Critically reflect on the potential relevance of counselling schools studied in the unit for their own developing approach to practice.
  5. Developing Supervision Skills


    This unit focuses on investigating different models of supervision and on developing supervision skills. Different models of supervision ranging from developmental, school specific, and reflective-practice models will be analysed and critiqued and their evidence-based examined. Professional supervision and its various tasks and functions will be explored in terms of the organisational and social context in which it is applied. Reflecting upon ethical principles of supervisory practice will also be a focus of the unit. The opportunity to practice and develop supervision skills will be provided with a view to developing one's own model of supervision.

    Learning Outcomes

    By completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Critically evaluate the major counselling and psychotherapy supervision theories and frameworks and their evidence base
    • Analyse the influence of organisational and social contexts on supervisory relationships
    • Articulate and apply their own model of professional supervision and the theoretical basis for the model
    • Develop and apply supervisory skills of giving feedback, discussing the supervisee's countertransference and addressing ethical issues
    • Reflect on their supervisory practice to ensure ethical practice and to identify power differentials.
  6. Developmental Psychology


    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Analyse the key concepts of developmental psychology and identify key controversies among theorists
    • Identify and critically evaluate a range of theories related to developmental psychology
    • Assess the influence of the family on the development of the individual
    • Identify and analyse the influence of family and attachment styles on the development of individuals
    • Explain the processes of ageing and dying, as developmental stages, from physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual perspectives
    • Critically analyse the influences of nature and nurture on development over the lifespan
    • Analyse developmental issues related to physical, cognitive, emotional, social, moral, and sexual areas of the self.
  7. Existential Therapy


    Most schools of psychotherapy have as their disciplinary basis philosophical concepts and methods, especially pertaining to notions of self and relationship with others. This unit provides an opportunity to develop an understanding of existential and phenomenological philosophy as a basis for therapeutic practice.

    Students are introduced to the concepts of self and experience that inform this modality, including the phenomenological method, the existential givens, and the question of authenticity. Students develop the skills of existential therapy through practising with real material; and will be able to critically evaluate and situate existentialism within the broader field of psychotherapy and counselling.

    By the completion of this unit students will have gained sufficient knowledge of the theory, methods and practice of existential therapy to integrate and apply the modality within a range of therapeutic situations and contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate in depth knowledge of phenomenological and existential philosophy, its development and concepts of "self"
    • Locate existential therapy in the spectrum of existing models of counselling and psychotherapy and critically evaluate its therapeutic effectiveness and limitations
    • Demonstrate integration of existential therapeutic methods with their own models of practice and therapeutic skills
    • Critically evaluate the model of existential therapeutic practice in relation to social theories of feminism, postcolonialism and cultural theory.
  8. Hypnotherapy


    This unit is designed to develop the student's understanding of hypnotherapy, its history, myths, evidencebased research, ethics, styles and contexts of hypnotherapy. The unit focusses on teaching relevant core hypnosis skills that can be used in conjunction with counselling and psychotherapy. The core hypnosis skills include: suggestibility tests, inductions, deepeners, and the use of scripts, language and imagery.

    An emphasis will be placed on permissive versus direct styles of hypnotherapy, as well as assessing and preparing the client for hypnotherapy. Students will examine how best to construct a counselling session incorporating hypnotherapy.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the unit students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological and physical characteristics of hypnotherapy, including the impact of conscious and unconscious characteristics
    • Identify key issues in the effective application of boundaries and ethics in the counselling hypnotherapeutic relationship
    • Analyse and evaluate evidence-based hypnotherapeutic interventions for working with different client issues
    • Demonstrate core abilities for educating the client in preparation for hypnotherapy and for evaluating, adjusting and modifying as appropriate, the use of hypnotherapy, in alignment with clients' needs
    • Demonstrate skills in the hypnotic induction of a client; the deepening of a trance and the integration of hypnotherapy and counselling skills in a session.

Recognition

This Master of Counselling and Psychotherapy is accredited by the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA). 

On successful completion of this course, you'll be eligible to be listed on the PACFA register at Intern, Provisional or Clinical level (depending on your experience) and as an Accredited Supervisor once the required hours of supervision practice have been completed.

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