social_work_courses

Diploma of Applied Social Science

  • You can use this Diploma of Applied Social Science as a gateway into a range of social science careers
  • JNI teachers support you right through to finishing the course & finding work

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At a glance

Study mode

laptop
OnlineIn-class

Provider

Jansen Newman Institute (RTO 0269)
Career Opportunities
Recognition

Nationally recognised - meets Australian Qualifications Framework standards.

Prerequisites
  • Year 12 ATAR score of 56 or equivalent, OR
  • A completed diploma level course, OR
  • Demonstrated ability, including work experience, formal/informal study, or a statement of intent
Location

NSW - Sydney

Online

Work placement

No placement; practical skills are gained through workshops

Course length
Accelerated: 7 months |Full-time: 1 years |Part-time: 2 years
Study mode

Online

In-class


Online

Study from anywhere, when it suits you best and graduate with the identical qualification as an on-campus student.

Blended

Study part of the course online. Combine your online learning with classes or practical sessions on-campus at a college or university.

In-class

Attend classes on-campus at a university, TAFE or college and interact face-to-face with teachers and fellow students.

Assessment
Exams, assignments & report writing
Start date

Six start dates per year.

Provider
Jansen Newman Institute (RTO 0269)

Jansen Newman Institute (JNI) provides flexible, industry-based training in counselling and psychotherapy.

The college has a strong reputation in the industry for producing highly competent graduates.

Jansen Newman Institute courses feature:

  • Practical training – so you graduate with the skills to step into a job
  • Flexible study options – so you can fit study around your life
  • The option to study at an accelerated rate – so you can finish your course sooner and start your career

Think: Colleges Pty Ltd (RTO 0269) trading as Jansen Newman Institute

Price

The course price can vary depending on a few factors, including whether you are an Australian resident or your chosen payment option. To find out more, contact the course provider.

Prerequisites

  • Year 12 ATAR score of 56 or equivalent, OR
  • a completed diploma level course, OR
  • demonstrated ability, including work experience, formal/informal study, or a statement of intent

What you'll learn

Become trained in:

  • Social theories and practice
  • Social research methods
  • Developing social policy
  • Social analysis

Practical workshops

All students will gain practical skills through on-campus workshops.

If you study online, you will need to attend 3-4 days of practical workshops throughout the course. These workshops are held in Sydney and Brisbane.

Course structure

8 units

Units

  1. Interpersonal communication


    This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

    This unit explores aspects of counselling as a form of interpersonal communication and considers the role of self and culture, as well as important relational skills such as perception, listening and reflection. Students learn about different modes of interpersonal communication including verbal, nonverbal, written and oral, as well as the barriers to effective communication and approaches for overcoming them. The unit also examines how different types of relationships (family, work, personal, and social groups) can be enhanced through effective communication. An informed awareness of power and rank is discussed.

  2. Theories of counselling


    This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

    In this unit students are introduced to influential counselling theories, including Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic theories, Person-centred Therapy, Existential Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Family Therapy, Feminist Therapy, Solution-Focused Therapy and Narrative Therapy. The subject utilises a range of experiential learning strategies including skills modelling and case studies, and introduces students to the counselling interventions used for each of these models. Such understanding is further developed in Applied Counselling 1, where students have the opportunity to observe and practise some of the therapeutic interventions used within these modalities.

  3. Human development across the lifespan


    This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

    This unit introduces students to the field of developmental psychology and explores what drives or motivates human behaviour. It examines the key life stages of birth, early and later childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, mid-life, ageing and death, taking into account their social and cultural contexts. Students are introduced to the work of scholarly work on the subject of human development.

    Drawing on a diversity of disciplines, topics include theories of attachment, cognitive and social development and the role of families and communities in supporting healthy development.

  4. Applied counselling 1


    This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

    In this unit, students are introduced to the core skills for counselling and change work, with specific reference to working with adults. The unit provides students with an opportunity to develop their counselling skills in an interactive and supportive learning environment with feedback from others, and to begin considering their preferred counselling style. The interrelationships between counselling theories and models and skills are explored. This subject also focuses on the research into counselling outcomes and effective change processes.

  5. Understanding societies: An introduction to social analysis


    This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

    In this subject, students are introduced to the interdisciplinary practice of social analysis and its role inunderstanding the various human elements and social institutions that constitute our communities and societies. It covers a variety of important social theories through which to understand human practices, identities and social structures. In particular, students learn how cultural, historical, economic and political factors shape the human experience.

    Students develop social analysis skills to critically examine how human and social elements shape our views about equality, justice and fairness. The subject encourages students to assess the relevance of these elements to our social and professional relations.

  6. Developing social policy


    This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

    In this unit students examine the nature and practice of social policy development through a study of key public policy areas such as education, health, welfare, the family, crime and law and order policy, drug and alcohol policy and employment policy. The focus of policy discussions is primarily within the context of Australian social, economic and political systems.

    Students examine the theoretical underpinnings of policy development, the role of politics and lobby groups in influencing social policy, the policy process, and how policy decisions are monitored and evaluated. The role of associations, such as NCOSS and ACOSS, and churches in monitoring the impact of government policy and advocating for vulnerable groups within society are also examined, with a view to students considering 'how else' policies can be informed and used effectively to bring about change and improvement to social conditions.

  7. Introduction to community services


    This unit introduces students to the structure, purpose and nature of the Australian health care system and community services. It explores the many contexts, settings and roles within this area of work, including the policies, theories and practices applicable to this field. Students learn about the important role and function of occupations in community services, and the practices involved such as advocacy, lobbying, networking, and support and service coordination. Students develop an understanding of the variety of community sector organizations that operate in Australia, sources of funding provided by local, state and federal governments, and the challenges, barriers and opportunities for accessing and providing the relevant but scarce resources to those in need. Attention will also be given to community development and programs through examples such as public housing, Indigenous community development, community consultation and public fora.

  8. Health & wellbeing


    This unit provides the context for understanding health and well-being in Australia. It begins by exploring the critical perspectives associated with defining health and well-being, and what impacts these definitions have on various sections of the community, especially those considered most marginal.

    Health policies, perceptions and promotional activities are analysed as to their impact on health equity and access to services and resources for various sections of the population. The health of individuals, community and society is also discussed in terms of the workplace, the environment and the proximity to service centres such as cities and towns. Students learn about current debates and the impact of serviceusers, consumer advocates and worker responses. International policies and research will inform many of the discussions.

Support and delivery

Studying online explained

Jansen Newman Institute offers a comprehensive support for all students.

You will receive one-on-one support to help you establish goals, create study plans and develop sound study skills.

Have a question about this course?

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