4 benefits of setting career goals

You might be aware how important it is to take time out to reflect on your work, but did you know it’s equally important to look ahead?

Smart goal setting can bring you significant benefits personally and professionally. So if you’re one of those people who don’t set goals because you’re just too busy or perhaps don’t see the point, you may want to consider the many advantages this seemingly small activity can bring.

To show you what you might be missing out on, we’ve put together some of the biggest benefits of setting career goals to inspire you.

Achieve greater focus and peace of mind

It’s no surprise that when you have clear career objectives, you know exactly what you’re working towards. You can free your mind from worrying about unnecessary things and concentrate on what’s required to achieve your goals.

Having greater focus means you’ll be able to prioritise important actions like finding a mentor, or upskilling in areas you could improve on. In asking “how does this help me reach my goals?” you’ll be able to ensure your decisions and actions actively contribute to helping you achieve your objectives.

Another happy side-effect of working toward solutions that suit you is that you’re more likely to end up finding greater career satisfaction.

lady writing in notebook

Use your time more effectively

Once you know what you want out of your career and what you need to do to get it, you won’t waste time on low value or unnecessary tasks in your personal and working hours. You’ll begin to appreciate the value of time – how much you have, and how much you need to achieve your goals.

If you’re one of the one-in-two Australian workers who are unhappy with their level of work-life balance, setting goals will help you identify the steps you need to take to obtain that balance, and gain greater control of your time.

Enjoy easier communication

Once you have your goals down, you’ll find it’s easier to communicate your passion and direction with friends and family. This could mean less friction at the dinner table and more opportunity to find out how your loved ones can help you reach your goals.

For example, if one of your career goals is to get a job at a company you love, you’ll be able to ask around to find if anyone in your network has a connection there. Or if your aim is to start studying with a course that will empower you to make that elusive career change, you should feel motivated to tell others who may have advice on education institutions or contacts for work experience opportunities.

Take responsibility for your actions

If you’ve ever worked in retail you’ll be familiar with sales targets – they provide a benchmark for success, and an objective that you’re responsible for working towards. Similarly, by defining and documenting your career goals you’re setting your own expectations for yourself. This makes you take responsibility for your actions, and in turn, you’ll become accountable for your own success.

Taking on this responsibility now can put you in good stead later on. Whether you’re aiming for a promotion or to be Prime Minister, setting and being accountable for your own goals plays a key role in setting you up for success.